Addiction

Displaying 1 - 17 of 17 articles

Aces

Paul Buck had a great job in finance until it was ruined by problem gambling. He believes the temptations to gamble are greater - and a lot more visible - for young people than they were when he was a teenager. Here he identifies the different stages when gambling becomes a problem and suggests where to go for help if you're concerned.

Gambling

Since when has gambling been something parents need to worry about? The law is clear, surely? Well, yes, it is, and under-18s aren't supposed to gamble - but 15% of 11-16 year-olds say that they've gambled in the last week. Plus we know that the earlier you start, the greater the chances of becoming a problem gambler in later life. So should parents be as concerned about gambling as about, say, drugs?

Playing cards

Is gambling an addiction like drugs? And is your child at risk of becoming a problem gambler?

Laughing gas

Laughing gas, also known as ‘Noz’, has become increasingly popular among young people in the UK. So what is it - and what does it do to people who take it?

A recent survey shows that ecstasy and LSD use among 16-24-year-olds has increased by 84% and 175% respectively in the past year. Overall drug use has remained constant – so why are these two gaining popularity with young people?

Legal highs can be every bit as dangerous and addictive as illegal drugs, and they're they're easier to get hold of. Make sure you and your child are clued up about the risks. 

The government has announced that it is to ban legal highs, currently available in 'head shops' up and down the country as well as online. Legal highs are new chemical compounds, untested and mysterious - so why have they become so popular and what effect will the ban have?

Brain

Cannabis is still the world’s most popular illegal drug worldwide - but in the UK, its use is falling.  For most people, cannabis is not a source of harm and is used to achieve a feeling of being relaxed and high.

LSD

LSD is one of the most famous hallucinogenic drugs. This year there has been an increase of 175% in the number of 16-to-24-year-olds admitting to using it.

Ecstasy use is on the rise among young people - why? And what should parents know about this drug? 

Alcohol

Drinkaware suggest following the Chief Medical Officer’s advice on underage drinking. 

In England, the guidelines are:

Alcohol

Our checklist of top tips for guarding your child against trouble with drink...

Alcohol and teens

Children are much more aware of alcohol than you think - have a look at our tips on how to handle the issue with your teen.

Why is it important to talk to your child about drinking before they're 13? The Alcohol Education Trust explains, and shares their tips for age-appropriate discussions. 

Wine glasses

The Chief Medical Officers of the different nations have slightly different guidelines relating to under-age drinking. Here's the advice from the Chief Medical Officer for Wales.

Alcohol and the law

Alcohol has a magnetic attraction for young people. Almost every parent of teenagers knows someone who's had a party go disastrously wrong because someone smuggled in bottles of vodka, or some child who's had to go to hospital. But what's the legal position? Should you ever give children a glass of wine with dinner? How old do they have to be before you take them into a pub? The law explained.

Wine glasses

The Chief Medical Officer’s recommendation for Scotland.