Digital

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Off-limits online

The digital world is so new that half the time we don't know what the rules are. In fact, there are plenty of laws governing what you can and can't do online. Here's our guide to what you should and shouldn't be doing online (legally, anyway).

viral internet trends

The growth of social media has brought with it some strange modern phenomena. One of the more recent ones is the viral online challenge...

Filters and parental controls may not be the complete answer to keeping children safe online, but they are undoubtedly the first line of defence. It's now possible to set filters on your broadband, your devices and your applications. Here, from Internet Matters, is what you need to know.

social media

If you want to set parental controls on apps such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, here's how to do it.

Nude selfies

CEOP's film explains what they are, and what parents should know about them.

Kik messenger

What adults need to know about the app their children love using.

A parents guide to WhatsApp

Teenagers love WhatsApp - as do a lot of parents. Here's what you need to know about it...

zoella, alfie deyes and louise pentland

Know your Zoellas from your PewDiePies: a parent's guide to vlogging.

Family digital

Parents sometimes end up paying unexpectedly large phone bills and don’t know why. PhonepayPlus, the premium rate services regulator, explains what to look out for when giving your child a mobile device…

The internet is a wonderful resource for young people and offers unprecedented opportunities for connecting and learning. But it can also be scary. Many parents are afraid their children will be exposed to upsetting content or meet dangerous people online. What are the facts about online risk?

Internet troll

Sadly, once your child explores the online world, they may find a troll waiting for them. Here's how to help them cope.

You’ve probably heard of public shaming. It’s a centuries-old punishment, for anything from a crime to someone doing something others feel is morally wrong. But what is online shaming? And how does it differ?

The average age of someone involved in cybercrime is just 17 years old. It's dropped from 24 since last year. Here are some tips on making sure you're aware of what your cyber-savvy child is up to, and encouraging them to use their skills positively. 

PEGI ratings symbols

Video games ratings explained in full.

Boy on tablet

How to keep your family safe when viewing video on demand and films online and on mobile devices.

Using smartphone

Support organisations for young people and parents who are concerned about what young people are having to deal with online.

Internet brain

There are considerable benefits to internet use for young people with autism and learning disabilities, with lots of apps and specialist tools - but there are also risks. We look at how best to prepare your child. 

Advice to parents on how much screen time small children should have has changed - basically, from 'none' to 'it's OK to have some.' Here are our commonsensical top tips on how to manage infants' screen time to make sure they develop healthily and happily without making life impossible for you.

Teens

Wondering what your children are tapping into their phones? Or, in fact, what it means? Here's our parent's guide to some popular teen chat acronyms and slang words. 

digital infants

You don't stop educating your children once they've learnt their phonics. They need to move up to understanding the meaning of what they're reading. In the same way, once your child is online and you're filtering and monitoring in the right way for their age, there's still a job to do. Here's a useful breakdown of what it means to be digitally literate, with some good news for parents.

Digital parenting

Top tips on staying up-to-date with what your children are doing online.

Children at screens

We're always hearing about 'digital natives' as if all young people are happily at home on the internet, knowing where to find all the good things, how to avoid the hazards and partying happily together. But what if most young people were just as anxious and lost as their parents? The experts think that's much closer to the truth...

Internet

Two thirds of young people have their own smartphone before they start secondary school (and some other interesting facts). How does your child's internet use compare?

Computer gaming

Do you sometimes feel your child is sharing not just too much information, but the wrong kind of information? Do you worry that their adolescent attitudes are going to hang over them for the rest of their lives? How do you talk to them about the identity they're creating with their friends - and how the internet makes that visible to everyone?

Connected

Researchers have been studying how children use smartphones, tablets and computers across Europe. So are children addicted to their phones? And how many have experienced cyberbullying? We have (some of) the answers...

Image changed through glasses to sunset and coloured sky

You can't shield your child from every risk in the online world, any more than you can offline. So how do you help them to be digitally literate (what does that even mean?) And what kind of parenting approach is most likely to help them stay safe?

Sharenting

Parent Info examines the very modern phenomenon of social media ‘sharenting’.

Children outdoors

With the summer holidays just around the corner, we've gathered some of the most exciting apps we’ve found to get kids outdoors and enjoy what nature has to offer.

Musical.ly is an app for creating and sharing lip sync videos among friends. What do parents and carers need to know about it? 

YouNow is a live video and chat app that's popular with young people. What should you know about it? 

Teens on Tinder

Tinder is one of the most popular dating apps out there. Here's what parents need to know.

YouTube

Kids can't get enough of the video sharing site. Read CEOP's comprehensive guide to everything parents need to know about it.

street fight

The rise of viral fight videos and how to help your child if they are involved

Tablet

Most popular social media services don’t allow anyone under 13 to join. Even so, lots of younger children manage to set up accounts. What can you do?

Going online

A lot of sites and apps specify that users must be aged over 13. Why 13? Vicki Shotbolt explains and offers a guide to the age limits for various popular online activities.

ooVoo is a group video chat service that has been the source of some controversy, with fears that children are giving away information to people they don't know. Like any popular online tool, used wisely it's great; used unwisely it can be a platform for problems. Here's everything you need to know about what ooVoo is, how to use it safely, and how to report anything worrying.

Ask.fm

Ask.fm is anonymous and has been known to lead to cyberbullying and taunting. Here is CEOP’s guide to Ask.fm in a series of FAQs for parents.

Snapchat

What do you need to know about Snapchat?

Snapchat

Does the fact that photos disappear from Snapchat make it completely safe to use? If things do go wrong, what can you do?

Snapchat

How to be a bit more careful, and a bit better informed, when using Snapchat.

Instagram

Instagram is now bigger than twitter. What's the big attraction? And is there anything you need to know?

Instagram

Some tips on responsible – and safe – use of Instagram.

Social media

‘Teens turn to, and are obsessed with whichever environment allows them to connect to friends. Most teens aren’t addicted to social media; if anything, they’re addicted to each other.’

There's been quite a lot of interest recently in monitoring apps, which allow you to track your child, alerting you to where they are and what they're doing. Sounds like a brilliant idea, no? But experts warn you should think twice before putting your child under surveillance. We look at the pros and cons.

12 year-old boy sitting and looking inscrutable

What goes online stays online. Some advice to help you and your child understand the long-term implications of publishing all about your life.

A tattoo is permanent, much like the information we post online. CEOP gives their top tips on making sure your child's online reputation is just as good as their offline one. 

Camera

Sex plus the teenage urge to take risks plus the constant presence of a camera and a 'send' button - it's probably not surprising that a lot of young people think sexting is a perfectly normal part of modern teenage relationships. Is it? How often do things go wrong? What happens when images get spread beyond the boy or the girl they were meant for?

Texting

What is sexting? Is it illegal to share naked or partially naked images of young people? Why has it become such a common activity? And how do you alert your child to the risks?

Looking out window

Sexting is almost the norm among some young people but sharing images of anyone under the age of 18 is illegal. So what should you say about sexting to your child? And how to respond if your child has sent an image they regret?

still from animated film

CEOP's Thinkuknow recently produced 4 short animated films on young people and taking nude selfies, and how to respond if your child sends a picture they regret. The films are based on research conducted over two years. Here CEOP underlines some of the key points.

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