Mental health

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Mental health stigma

Natasha Devon, the government’s Mental Health Champion for Schools, offers advice on how to help your child.

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1 in 10 children will experience a mental health problem - around three children in every classroom in the UK. A new campaign says it's time to do something to help them.

How to spot the signs and what you can do to help if your child is a sufferer.

Boy at desk

Did you know that, on average, three children in every classroom have a diagnosable mental health issue?

Crayon drawing

In this video, Claire Usiskin from YoungMinds talks about warning signs to look out for if you're concerned about your child's mental health - and what to do.

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Is depression a fact of teenage life? What are the signs of depression and what can you do if you're concerned that your child may be depressed? Young Minds' Lucy Maddox offers some advice.

Good mental health

What does good mental health look like when it comes to young people?

Houses of Parliament

Are mental health problems rising in children and young people? And is the internet to blame? An influential committee of MPs calls for more support for mental illness among the young.

Black cloud

When young people admit to having mental health problems, parents often blame themselves. There is still stigma and shame attached to this kind of illness, despite the fact that it's so common. But early diagnosis and treatment have been shown to work so it's important for parents to be open and supportive. Blaming yourself - or anyone else - doesn't help.

Sad girl

Girls in years 7 and 8 are a lot more anxious and unhappy than they were five years ago. Researchers from University College London suggest this may be the result of sexualised images of women in impact of social media.

Recent figures suggest that it's wrong to think self-harm is just a girls' problem. Boys are being admitted to hospital for this too - but because it looks different, it sometimes isn't recognised. It's not only harder to spot self-harm among girls, but also harder to get treatment. Here's what you need to know about boys and self-harm.

self-harm

Why do young people self harm and what can you do to help them?

It can be extremely distressing to find out someone you love is self-harming. Consultant psychiatrist Dr Andrew Hill-Smith writes about how best to respond: what to say and when to hold back.

Self-harm

A new study out in autumn 2014 suggests that self-harm among teens in England has trebled in the last decade. What warning signs do you need to look out for?

Seeing your child scratching, biting, hitting or banging their head can be incredibly distressing - but it's a not uncommon experience for parents of children with intellectual disabilities. Cerebra explain self-injury and what parents can do.

Suicide, suicidal thoughts, 13 Reasons Why

​There has been substantial media coverage of the Netflix Series 13 Reasons Why. The drama has been accused of inaccurately portraying, or even glamourising, suicide. Dr Alys Cole-King Clinical Director, of the Social Enterprise Connecting with People, and Dr Stan Kutcher, Sun Life Financial Chair in Adolescent Mental Health, offer advice to parents on talking to their children about the programme and its difficult subject matter

Bench silhouette

Suicidal thoughts are more common that most of us realise - and different triggers can tip thoughts into action. Ged Flynn of Papyrus, the national charity dedicated to the prevention of young suicide, outlines what parents need to know.

Ten tips for talking to teachers if your child is being picked on at school.

online bullying Jedidja PD

Practical advice for parents of children who are being bullied or who are bullying someone else.

Child gaming online

Expert advice on how to cope with this common form of cyberbullying.

The word 'gay' gets bandied about all the time - 90% of students said they had used it to mean 'useless' or 'rubbish' at least once. Here, Stonewall, which runs a homophobic, biphobic and transphobic antibullying campaign, explains why this is hurtful and can inflict long-term damage. There are also tips for helping young people who have been affected by this kind of bullying; plus advice on making sure that your child doesn't become one of the bullies.

Homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying can be very painful but is extremely common. More than half of LGBT young people say they have been bullied at school. Here Stonewall offer some advice on how to help your child if they're on the receiving end and some sensible and sympathetic approaches if you find out that your child is among the bullies.

Jedidja

National children’s charity, Kidscape, offers parents tips on how to help their children sif they are being bullied.

Kidscape bullying

Top tips for children and young people from Kidscape.

helping hand

Scotland's anti-bullying service, Respect Me, offers parents advice on how to help children caught up in bullying behaviour

Bullying Scotland

Scotland's anti-bullying service, Respect Me, offers parents advice on how to help children caught up in bullying behaviour

Cyberbullying

Alex Holmes, the Diana Award anti-bullying programme manager, was previously a victim of bullying and now runs the anti-bullying ambassadors programme. In this video, he explains what cyberbullying is, why it hurts - and what you can do about it.

Bullying

Alex Holmes, anti-bullying manager for the Diana Awards, offers advice on how to recognise bullying and what to do if your child is affected.

Reaching out

Alex Holmes, anti-bullying programme manager for the Diana Award, outlines some useful things to do if your child is being bullied.

Bulimia binge purge

Bulimia is the most common eating disorder. Here's Dr Pooky Knightsmith's advice on how to tell if your child is affected - and where to get help. 

Broaching the subject of an eating disorder can be alarming. But the numbers of young people being treated in hospital for eating disorders are rising. It's a live issue for many parents. Here, with help from Beat, the leading charity supporting those with eating disorders and their families, we offer our tips for talking to your child.

Black cloud

Anorexia is the best-known eating disorder, although not the commonest (that's bulimia). It's a serious disease and sufferers are often secretive about their suffering. We explain how to spot the symptoms and what to do if you're concerned.

It's unusual for young people with eating disorders to get better on their own. Here's our roundup of treatments available on the NHS and from other support services.

eating disorder help

Hospital admissions for eating disorders among young people have almost doubled in three years. Here, Priory explains eating disorders and offers their advice on supporting your child's recovery. 

More young people are being admitted to hospital because of eating disorders. Is the internet part of the problem? We talk to Beat's Rebecca Field to find out. 

The numbers of young people admitted to hospital with eating disorders have doubled in the last three years, according to the NHS. Pro-anorexia and pro-bulimia websites are widely seen as a big part of the problem. We look at what these sites are and why they're seen as so toxic.